Top Customer Experience Experts
Top Customer Experience Experts

302: Nathanael Zurbruegg – Overcoming Life’s Greatest Challenges

Nathanael Zurbruegg Helps You Learn How to Live Life to the Fullest

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Nathanael Zurbruegg Show Notes Page

Nathanael Zurbruegg has been chronically ill since he was 3 years old. He has been through 3 failed kidney transplants, over 4300 Dialysis treatments, and 3 lung infections. Doctors have said he shouldn’t be alive for 6 times by now!

Having been through this many challenges in life, Nathanael shares his strategy of having a victorious mindset in life and having an attitude of never giving up. No matter how hard life may get, there is still hope. It’s important not to focus on the negative, but instead focus on the positive. Listen to this episode as Nathanael Zurbruegg shares how we can have a victorious mindset that can overcome life’s greatest challenges.

Nathanael Zurbruegg was born and raised in a small town called Adelboden in the beautiful Swiss Alps. However, most of his childhood and part of his teenage years, he spent life mostly in a University Hospital in the Capital City of Switzerland, which is called Bern.

Nathanael has three older brothers. Two of them are married with kids, and his third brother is in a relationship. His parents are the most supportive parents he could have wished because of the hard journey he went through as a child and teenager. His parents are still married after being together for over 40 years!

Nathanael has developed early on an attitude of gratitude, positivity, and never giving up. He admires freedom to travel, which probably comes from being continuously bound to treatments or hospitals. Growing up, Nathanael has always been a fighter throughout his life, never to give up! His dad, who came from a hardworking farmer family, mostly influenced it.

Nathanael started working as a building painter. He absolved an apprenticeship for 3-4 years. Due to missing many days because of having to do his life-saving treatments 3x a week, he did the apprenticeship in 4 years instead of 3 years.

After he worked full time as a painter, Nathanael also worked as a Kids Ski instructor during the wintertime for three years before moving to Australia for 4.5 years, enrolling in a Leadership College.

After finishing the leadership college, he discovered that his story is very inspirational and life-changing for many. So in January of 2016, he began a career as a Global Inspirational Speaker and Victorious Mindset Mentor. Now he helps and inspires people to develop a victorious mindset regardless of their situation.  His mission is to challenge the average life of what people are living across the world.

Nathanael’s legacy is to be an inspiration that nothing is impossible to achieve, even though you may be burdened with lots of limitations. Never ever give up life.

One of his most important missions is to build 10 Hospitals in slums that help people not just to get physical help but also emotional and spiritual support. He is committed to breaking the pattern of poverty, low self-esteem and low dignity.

Nathanael currently lives in a small town on the lake of Zurich about 30 minutes from Zurich.

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to Nathanael Zurbruegg get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShowClick to Tweet

“There are no limitations to the mind except the ones we acknowledge.”Click to Tweet

“Limitations are nothing else than the perspective we see them.”Click to Tweet

Hump to Get Over

Nathanael Zurbruegg has been chronically ill since he was 3 years old. He has been through 3 failed kidney transplants, over 4300 Dialysis treatments, and 3 lung infections. Doctors have said he shouldn’t be alive for 6 times by now!

Advice for others

Be yourself in every situation.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Emotional Intelligence

Best Leadership Advice

No one can go to the top alone. You always have to have people around you that can help you.

Secret to Success

Getting up everyday and never giving up.

Best tools in business or life

My mindset.

Recommended Reading

 

Links and Resources

Unlimit You website: https://unlimityou.co/

Nathanael’s website: https://nathanaelzurbruegg.com/

Nathanael’s LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nathanael-zurbruegg-0b9209b9

Nathanael’s Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Live-Life-to-the-Fullest-450073795453235/

Fast Leader Show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/FastleaderNet

Fast Leader Show on Apple Podcast: https://apple.co/364qAA2

Fast Leader Show on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FastLeaderShow

Fast Leader Show on Twitter: https://twitter.com/fastleadershow

Fast Leader Show on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fastleader.net

Show Transcript

Click to access unedited transcript

Unedited Transcript

Jim Rembach (00:00):

Okay, fast leader Legion today. I’m excited because we’re going to have somebody on the show today who is going to help us to really focus on the things that are important, uh, and, and really, you know, try to overcome, be more resilient, you know, and make a better future for ourselves. Nathanael Zurbruegg was born and raised in a small town called El Bowden in the beautiful Swiss Alps. However, most of his childhood and part of his teenage years, he spent mostly in the university hospital in the capital city of Switzerland, which is called Bern. And the FanDuel has three brothers. Two of them are married with kids and his third brother is in a relationship. His parents are the most supportive parents he could have wished for because the hard journey that he went through as a child and teenager, um, world’s really a situation where his parents made a significant difference for him.

Jim Rembach (00:51):

His parents are still married after being together for over 40 years. Nathaniel has developed early on an attitude of gratitude and positivity and never give up. He admires freedom to travel, which probably comes from being continuously bound to treatments or hospitals growing up, Nathanael has always been a fighter throughout his life, never giving up. There’s this mantra. His dad came from a hardworking family and that mostly influenced him. Nathanael started working as a building painter and he absolved a, an apprenticeship for three to four years due to missing many days because of having to do his life-saving treatments three times a week. He did the apprentice and four years instead of three, after he worked full-time as a painter, Nathaniel also worked as a kids ski instructor instructor during the winter time for three years before moving to Australia for four and a half years, enrolling in a leadership college.

Jim Rembach (01:46):

After finishing the leadership college, he discovered that his story is very inspirational and very life changing for many. So in January of 2016, he began a career as a global inspirational speaker and victorious mindset mentor. Now he helps and inspires people to develop a victorious mindset regardless of their situation. His mission, his mission is to challenge the average life of what people are living across the world. Nathanael’s legacy is to be an inspiration that nothing is impossible to achieve, even though you may be burdened with lots of limitations, never ever give up life. One of his most important missions is to build 10 hospitals in slums that help people not to just get physical health, but also emotional and spiritual support. He has committed to breaking the pattern of poverty, low self-esteem and low dignity, but Daniel currently lives in a small town on the Lake of Zurich, about 30 minutes from Zuora, Nathanael Zurbruegg. Are you ready to help us get over the hump?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (02:50):

Yeah, I’m here. Hey, amazing. Thank you so much for having me today. I’m so excited to be here and, uh, well, what a great show to be on and add value to all of your listeners?

Jim Rembach (03:02):

Well, I’m glad you’re here now. And, and for me having you on the show, people may think, well, fast leader show, we’re talking about customer centric leadership. We’re talking about, you know, how to engage internally and engage externally. And for me, when you start thinking about hardships, when you start thinking about changes in the world, um, you know, we need a message like yours in order for us to really focus on the things that are purpose driven, you know, mission-based, uh, difference making. And that’s why I wanted to have you on the show. But if you could please share with the Legion a little bit about your passion.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (03:39):

Yeah, sure. So, uh, three, um, listened already to the, to the passion in the previous sentence or the paragraph, I will have the passion to inspire people to live an inspirational life, um, that a life that lives it above average and a laugh that the reality is that no matter the circumstances described as the limitation that we might have, and, and we all have them at some point of life that we have an unlimited potential we can add that can, um, create such great values for, for this world. And, uh, in my case, um, even the pain, like so far, most of the pain has turned into purpose and, uh, I’m a big believer in, uh, living a life that everything will work out together for the good. And, uh, that’s why I’m so passionate about

Jim Rembach (04:40):

PayPal so that you get in, you talk about this most victorious mindset. What is the Victoria’s mindset?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (04:48):

I think firstly, it’s all about not focusing on what’s happening, wait now, but looking into the future and what could be, um, what could be possible. And so many times we, we naturally are drawn to react emotionally or physically or spiritually into a habit of what happening right now. But what I realized that we always have to tunity to switch the main kit to a victorious mindset that says, okay, I might have the problem right now, but I’m gonna take the problem and turn it into an opportunity. And that, for me, the beauty of having the mind powerful tool in our life that we can change, um, almost any team that is in front of art might look hopeless that might look difficult or complicated and turn it into something beautiful.

Jim Rembach (05:52):

Okay. So when you say it, it’s like, Oh yeah, no problem. We can do that. Uh, however, you know, all of us, when we start thinking about our own natural wiring, you know, Hey, I have the DNA and I was born this way. Right. Um, and then we think about, you know, the different starting points. It’s kind of like for me, the analogy that I can connect with in my mind is like, just talk about an Olympic Olympic athlete, you know, and you, and you look at a child and say, can all children be Olympic athletes? And for me, I don’t believe they can. I mean, I think you’d have some God-given, you know, elements, you know, that could possibly give you the opportunity to become one, you know, but then it’s, self-realization, it’s focused commitment, mind the mind, you know, the mindset, you know, there’s several different components that go into it.

Jim Rembach (06:44):

So while we can sit here and say, it’s pay, man, this is easy. All right. And you know, you never having a hard time don’t focus on today and what you’re going through. Let’s focus on tomorrow. Not everybody can easily do that and then also sustain it. Right. Um, and I think that’s part of the human condition in the struggle. So if we start talking about me, I say, I have the DNA I made this way. And I focus in on today too much. I focus in on the negative and the threats too much. How can I begin to reprogram myself so that I can get to the point to where I have Victoria’s mindset. Right.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (07:20):

Great question. I think that the beauty of fate firstly said it, um, it doesn’t matter how we are born or what we are born with. I think the beauty is that we can even change that. And of course we have the DNA, we are wired and tinting, I’m certain way. Um, back to your question, it, like, I think it’s a constant, lifelong learning. And for me, I remember it didn’t, it didn’t start with one year old. I didn’t start with 11 years or it didn’t start with 15 years or it somewhere started along the way to realizing our, okay, those events that are coming at me, um, where they would have lost kidney transplant three times or four year collations, uh, over their lifetime. Um, I realized that each time I can take a step into the positive side of the event or the negative side of the event.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (08:27):

So let me give you a short example. I was 11 years old when I had lost my third kidney transplant. And so the moment I realized, okay, my, my, my being is really drawn to seeing all the negative things, having to go back to the life support or yeah. Dialysis treatment. And the moment I realized, okay, let’s let focusing on what I still have, for example. Um, and then now realize, okay, there might be people out there, they can’t even walk, but I still have legs. I can walk. And, um, or there might be honored, uh, things I can still read my fingers. I can still see and all those chains, I think the cool thing is we can compare each artist with the different way we usually do, like comparing to someone that might not have it. So we usually compare each other with what other people might have that we want, but we can change it to looking at people or [inaudible] situation to say, okay, they don’t have it, um, might not beat up, but in a situation I take tank. And what it does is to really create momentum and energy in your mind, to focusing more and more on the positive side of the event that happened.

Jim Rembach (10:10):

So for me, what you’re talking about is really for all of us as individuals, we have to learn how to master ourselves.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (10:17):

Absolutely. Yeah, yeah. My mind, uh, getting it into a training, it’s quite comical. We have to do it daily. Uh, we have to really, um, we have so many decisions to do each day and every get Cision actually tells out whether we go into their left side or the white side. And, uh, I think that’s so important. The, see, I said everyday training for, uh, nine Chet.

Jim Rembach (10:47):

So as I’m thinking, I start looking at, you know, a lot of the stress factors that are, you know, on people every single day. And I start for me of course, because of what I do and what I believe in. And it’s all about, you know, helping, serving, supporting, uh, and developing and, and, uh, start, I started looking at being able to put in frameworks and processes and practices in order to help guide me. So I can’t just, I can’t just approach it with saying, Oh, well, I’ll just figure it out. Right. Going back to that mastering of cell. So for me, there’s many things that I heard you saying is I have to focus in on what’s more aspirational. Um, I have to focus in on gratitude. Um, I have to focus in on inspiration. And when I, if I do those things, even if I’m in a stressful, you know, conflicting scenario, whether it’s with an employee or a customer, you know, it it’s cut, it comes down to both mastering myself and the situation. And then the outcome becomes quite different.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (11:51):

Absolutely. And I, it’s, it’s such a powerful thing to do because you have the ability to change it. And, uh, what, what I often tell myself when I’m in a difficult situation and there’s a 50, 50, um, situation is usually mostly goes back to reflecting on who am I do I fit, um, as a person with my strength passionate into what, what position do I need to make in order to get into that perfect teeth stream of, um, of the mindset. And, uh, the more I know myself or the more we know ourselves, that the easier it is to, to figure out what is the right thing to do, because we go back to the court, we go back to the fundamental, um, being unbelief that we are, and then we can go from there to, to basically shape the way we way we want to go B do a half.

Jim Rembach (13:02):

Well, gosh, as you’re talking, I started thinking about, um, you know, the, the situation that we’re in and the think about the equation of all of this, right? So I have my DNA in where I started my wiring. I had my different starting points. I have, you know, all, all of these factors. And then I started thinking about, well, sleep, you know, that will affect it. I started thinking about nutrition, that’ll affect it. I start thinking about, um, you know, EV everything associated, uh, you know, with exercise, you know, and, and, you know, like, for example, with this whole COVID scenario, I think I saw some researcher study report that same said something to the effect of the entire world. Um, you know, it has essentially gained 15% additional weight, you know, during this COVID tongue, right. So we’re not, we’re not as mobile, you know? And so therefore we’re more sedentary. Um, and, and so I start thinking about that starts affecting, you know, my, my whole mindset and, you know, the victorious mindset, you know, versus, you know, a negative mindset. So when you start talking about helping people to get this victorious mindset and, and the formula, the equation, and all the factors, you know, how, what, what are the pillars that you help them focus in on?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (14:21):

Great question. Um, I’d say the first thing is, uh, the dish calling your shelf mode, like really reflecting on who am I. And, uh, the beautiful thing is that we all have a unique DNA of behaving. And you, um, how do you say that responding to tanks and, uh, we team that is a lot of strings passionate values that we have, where dad is in constellation of, um, nobody has today now in our world. Um, like we might have known people that have the same strengths as we have, but you know, that the whole constellation is so beautiful, unique, and this is the first step, the second, um, steps that I help people easily, which to really identifying, uh, well, what can I do with my constellation model, um, strength, passionate values, which comes to the question, what am I here for? Like what I, what am I here for to do with all these things?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (15:34):

And, uh, the, that of course dishes, uh, again, it’s not a one event discovery thing. It’s, uh, it’s a lifelong journey. But as I say before, the more, you know, it, the more you, you’re confident in that, the more you can, you can switch to do that, do a victorious living because, um, it, it, it’s a great perspective that you get, uh, uh, uh, Kuwait situation that you can make out of it of a bad situation. And, uh, the third thing is what I help people at Wally to really create a dream or a vision from now, who am I on the, what I’m here for two steps, because the moment you see yourself into something bigger than you are, you get so much energy and factory already. So like it kind of fundamental thing to the boots on it. And the beauty is that momentum comes up and, uh, energy comes up and, and really having a sense of where I want to go with my life. And the 14 doesn’t stay with creating a dream of vision. The 14, there needs to really out leave everything. Um, we, we division under pre-me and, and making daily decisions that lead me closer to the dream or the vision with who am I, what I’m half, what am I, what am I here for giving me, um, um, with what way I want to go,

Jim Rembach (17:22):

Okay. Then as you’re saying that for me, I started thinking about to me, what you’re doing is you’re helping people build momentum. So you’re starting with this core foundation. And once that, you know, becomes solid in a and something that bed rocking can be built upon, the building becomes easier and faster. Otherwise I’m always shifting and trying to try to control for a loose foundation.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (17:50):

Yeah, absolutely.

Jim Rembach (17:54):

Okay. So to me, when you start talking through this, I start thinking that an organization is very similar. Uh, so I was doing some research, uh, talking about organizational transformations as they’re currently existing today. And there’s been needless to say because of the COVID and acceleration of transformation occurring in the perspective of people start doing what you’re kind of what you’re referring to questioning the why. Right. Um, Simon Sinek is famous for the whole why thing, but, um, you know, when, when you start looking at it from an organizational perspective, I think, you know, all of us are kind of starting to ask, what is our purpose? Why are we here? Why am I working with this organization? Why do I work with these colleagues by the way, you know, do this particular job. I mean, all of that. So it was really quite interesting for me. It’s like, there’s two statistics, um, that are also extremely interesting with all this COVID, uh, which stuff is that, you know, divorce rates are going up, you know, as well as birth rates are going up. So you’re like, Whoa, you know, it’s just amazing to me how people, you know, are going through this transformation right now, that’s been forced to some degree and accelerated. Um, but I think it’s going back to some of those foundational components that you talk about and even organizations are doing the exact same thing. So here’s what I preach. I propose, or I project, um, is that we’re going to have more organizations become extinct because they’re unable to do this foundational work. Um, and then you’re gonna have some organizations accelerate or thrive because they are

Nathanael Zurbruegg (19:40):

Just amazing. Yeah, I absolutely loved that. And I think like the foundation is so important because, um, you know, was in a, in the information age that we live in. Um, I think so many people are confused where they should start. Um, you, you can, you can, uh, I don’t know what the number is about the books today. You could read that day, uh, or they coming out and they still mushed him, but the more, you know, your fundamental beliefs, strength, passion, and values, and who you are, the more you can go into the reaction that you really called to be. And, uh, that, that the cool thing is that once at a certain point, when you are dead, um, you really feel like being yourself. Um, you know what I mean? Like, oftentimes I feel like we all have to, we go automatically with the cut out.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (20:42):

Um, and then the moment we realize, well, we actually don’t fit to the code of the hundred people. We should step out. Then you have 99 people over there, you have your shelf over here. And so this is where it starts. It takes a lot of courage, a lot of braveness, but when you know, your fundamental, uh, who, who you are, we, we should, of course never stops learning about it, but the more, you know, it, the more confident you get in a doing who you really need to be and who you really are in the inside.

Jim Rembach (21:22):

Well, needless to say, talking about, you know, my word that I had mentioned, what I interpreted and several of the things that you were saying was inspiration. And one of the things that we absolutely do on the show to help us get some inspiration is listen to favorite quotes that others have. Is there a quote or two that you like that you’d like to share?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (21:42):

Yeah, sure. Um, for me it’s, well, there are many, but I’m going to give one where she’s the one from a Napoleon Hill think and grow rich, which says there are no limitation to their mind except the ones we acknowledge. And that has been so true over, over their lifetime that I realized actually limitations are not ours. And the perspective we see them or the, the, uh, the focus we have. And I think that, um, it’s not, um, for me, it’s not really completely relying on, uh, on my main tech alone. Um, I, I’m a person of faith and I believe that there is a God up there who I can have an unconditional loving relationship with him and, and he knows my life and he knows everything about me, but the fact in the everyday life to make clear decisions to get out of limitation, we actually are able with the mind to, uh, not acknowledging, acknowledging the delimitation. And, uh, so I really want to inspire you to hold on and that, because there’s so much more in you, there’s so much more, um, greatness and potential in you that everybody does listening today. And, um, because it’s not there yet doesn’t mean that it will not come in the future. It, she had a, um, sense of having a way focus and perspective

Jim Rembach (23:22):

Or keep striving to thrive. Right. Okay. So, I mean, we, we got a little bit about, you know, some of the things that you had to go through and it’ll show, we always talk about getting over the hump. Um, so if we could, um, and I’m sure there’s a, been a lot of those humps along the way you talked about, you know, kidney transplant failures and several other things, but if you could tell us a story about the time where you’d, hadn’t had to get over the hump quicker.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (23:49):

Well, there are many times I think that, uh, Judah two times the first time, I wasn’t really, uh, consciously aware that it was when I was two year old. And, uh, I was falling into a coma for two weeks. And, um, did we, LA the reality was that the doctors called my parents to say, Hey, please come into the ICU because we have done everything that we could do. And there is nothing else we can do right now. And, uh, if he’s telling him how she’ll she’ll wave, he will never be able to walk, talk and function by himself. My parents come into the ICU. Um, you basically terminate my life, but, uh, nothing changed. So my doctor turned off all the life support machines that I was on, and the moment they did it, um, I started to talk and said, Hey, mom, I want to go into the playing room and play. And I do realize that I say that, but I don’t know because the coma is a, it’s a weird thing. Um, I, I knew what’s going on around me, but I was no desk. Um, I actually knew a lot of, I got a lot of pictures in my mind that I only few, a few years later called a

Jim Rembach (25:20):

Cold

Nathanael Zurbruegg (25:21):

Put on like a parcel where they belong those pictures. And, uh, so that was one thing I recall it, I, of course I didn’t recover straight away from one day to another. That was one time. The other time was when I was, um, about 10 years old when I lost my second kidney transplant. Again, um, you have to realize that after, uh, at age seven, I got my second kidney transplant for two and a half years. And at that time I actually learned a lot of things that, uh, children learn from age one, two or three years old. Uh, I learned to, to feed myself, I learned to go out, cry out hobbies, um, meeting up with people, friends going to kindergarten and schools and all this charting. And, uh, actually from one week to another, my chronic illness strike back and destroyed the kidney.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (26:26):

And the kidney was my best friend. That’s how I function when I was a child. And, um, all the sudden I realized I have to go back to my old life, normal free time. I have to go to dialysis three times week again. I had to look on the diet that I don’t eat much food that I shouldn’t eat. And, um, I fell into a huge depression of about two weeks. I remember the time lying on the couch at my parents’ place. Um, not eating anything for two weeks or more, not moving anything for two weeks. Um, even though my pad and always tried to talk with me, I didn’t want to talk. And all, everything that happened in my mind was I want to end this life. I didn’t understand why this happened to me. I didn’t understand, uh, why H always, um, the me included in, in every bad thing.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (27:31):

And so I ended, like I literally ended my life in my mind, but I never tried to end it practically. I realized that even though in this difficult time, there were always another side that said, Hey, don’t do it. And there was a site that said, Hey, do it, do it right now. But for the sake of realizing that, um, when I do it, I’m gonna give other people, um, way more pain. And somehow my parents realized after two weeks that they have to do some things. So we had, um, I have to tell you that they never found out. They only found out years later that I had talked of she retired, but I realized, okay, I can’t talk to their son. We have to bring some, uh, uh, pastoral care and, and a particular beast into their home. And, uh, I realized that from that time, I somehow way culturally, I got so much screened again, where they was, uh, physically, mentally, or spiritually. And, uh, that were those two times where I really, uh, struggled and had to, to, to learn, to take that situation and turn it into something, uh, better and created. Yeah.

Jim Rembach (29:06):

Well, thanks for sharing that. And I mean, talking about the life impacts and the impacts you’ve had on others, I think that’s a Testament of, you know, why you, you survived all of that. So, but what I think about, you know, what you’re doing, um, with works with the victorious, um, mindset mentor, you know, right now the whole global speaking things kind of turned a little sideways. Um, but when I start thinking about goals, you know, some people may look at, you know, all of your, um, situations that you’ve been through and the things that you’ve had to overcome and say, you know, Hey, you know, you’re really just looking at goals from day to day. Uh, you’re not talking like that. You’re talking about long-term goals. So is there a one goal that you can share with us?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (29:51):

Yeah, absolutely. I think the biggest call that I have is to 10 hospitals and lamps with my soon to be NGO, uh, because I love to, uh, one of my strengths is being generous and I’ve been there at a blessing to really grow up in a Chinese family. And I love to, to take situation in my life to turn it into something that, um, helps people. And the reality why I have to call is because I, at some point, um, that was about three, four years ago. Uh, I wanted to leave a legacy that goes beyond my life. And, uh, you know, what comes to mind is first, okay, let’s pull it, call a homeless how for, for homeless people, um, whatever. But I realized, okay, there’s so many things in this world already. So why not taking my experience of having spend about almost 50% of my life in the hospital and take that and put it the, in this world way truly needed. And, um, yeah, that actually, yeah, my, my biggest goal that I want to achieve and, uh, um, it doesn’t look like that at the moment, but I know that it’s going to be happy one day, if I keep it ongoing.

Jim Rembach (31:22):

And the fast leader Legion wishes you the very best now, before we move on, let’s get a quick word from our sponsor. And even better place to work is an easy to use solution that gives you a continuous diagnostic on employee engagement, along with integrated activities that will improve employee engagement and leadership skills, and everyone using this award winning solutions guaranteed to create motivated, productive, and loyal employees who have great work relationships with our colleagues and your customers to learn more about an even better place to work, visit Yon wral.com for slash better winning solutions, guaranteed to create motivated, productive, and loyal employees who have great work relationships with our colleagues and your customers to learn more about an even better place to work visit [inaudible] dot com slash better. All right, here we go. Fast and your Legion it’s time for the home. Okay. Now, Daniel, they hold on this part of our show where you give us good insights back, and I’m going to ask him several questions and your job is to give a robust, yet rapid responses that are gonna help us move onward and upward faster. Nathaniel [inaudible] are you ready to hold down?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (32:22):

I’m fully ready. I’m always up for it.

Jim Rembach (32:26):

So what is holding you back from being an even better leader today?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (32:30):

Oh, great. I think my emotional intelligence at the moment, um, I’ve realized that, uh, right now I will be working on myself with all my cognitive behavior and all that, because, um, when you fight about 31 year on the road with a chronic illness, there are a lot of things going on inside you that you never took time to, to, to, to, uh, confront or focus on. And, uh, at 12 family-wise I passed away. So there are a lot of teams that I need to improve emotionally wise. And, um, yeah, that, that’s my, uh, current situation that I leave on to be a better leader.

Jim Rembach (33:22):

And what is the best leadership advice you’ve ever received?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (33:27):

Um, yeah, I will say, uh, don’t go. You never, no one can go to the top alone. You always have to have people around you that can help you. And, uh, for me that a really big thing, a challenge because, um, crude my developing a Victoria mentored, I had, I’m having a hard time to get help. And so this is something that I’m really learning as far as today.

Jim Rembach (33:59):

So what is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success? What do you feel is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to your success?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (34:12):

Uh, definitely going up every day and never giving up.

Jim Rembach (34:17):

And what do you feel is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (34:22):

My mindset.

Jim Rembach (34:25):

And what would be one book you’d recommend to our Legion? It could be from any genre.

Nathanael Zurbruegg (34:30):

Uh, definitely 10 conclusion. And, uh, yeah, that, that is at the moment I got so many good books out there.

Jim Rembach (34:39):

Yes. Okay. Fast leader Legion. You can find links to that. And other bonus information from today’s show by going to fast leader.net forward slash Nathaniel’s rubric. Okay. Nathaniel, this is my last day out on question. Imagine you’ve been given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25 and you can take the knowledge and skills that you’d have now back with you, but you can’t take it all. You can only take one. So what skill or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (35:03):

Great question. Um, being, uh, I will say being myself, like in every situation and not a hiding something or someone that I’m not until I have done that a lot in my twenties. Yeah.

Jim Rembach (35:23):

Nathaniel, I had fun with you today. Can you please share with the past leader leading how they can connect with you?

Nathanael Zurbruegg (35:28):

Absolutely. It’s how a data business website that you can go on, which is unlimited or Theo or my personal that you can check out [inaudible] dot com. And on both of those websites, you can check out my free ebook that you can download for free and go through the first step to unlimit your life.

Jim Rembach (35:51):

But Daniel silver, thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom. The past literally honors you. And thanks you for helping us get over the hump.

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