CX Top Tips

074: Hyrum Smith: I was a mess and grateful Covey talked first

0

Hyrum Smith Show Notes

Hyrum Smith was asked by Rudy Giuliani to come speak to the families of the victims of the World Trade Center attack. It became one of Hyrum’s toughest and most rewarding speaking experiences he has ever had. But before he could open his mouth a fireman jumped up to speak. Listen to what he said and how Hyrum got over the hump.

Hyrum was born in Centerville, Utah and raised in Hawaii, where his father was a professor of Speech. Hyrum grew up with a real need to be sensitive to other people’s feelings. It’s how he was brought up.

After graduating high school Hyrum spent two years in London, England. Upon his return he was drafted into the army.

After graduating Honor Graduate from Officers Candidate School, he commanded a Pershing Missile unit in Germany. Hyrum graduated from Brigham Young University in 1971 in Business Management.

After spending several years in corporate America Hyrum decided he wanted to teach. So in 1981 Hyrum founded the Franklin Quest Company. Among the company’s other products, Smith created the Franklin Planner and seminars on productivity development based on the “belief window” and other concepts. In 1997, Franklin Quest merged with Stephen R. Covey’s Covey Leadership Center to form Franklin Covey.

Hyrum is author of several books, including 10 Natural Laws of Successful Time and Life Management, What Matters Most, The Power of Perception, and more with his latest release being The 3 Gaps: Are You Making a Difference?

Hyrum believes that the you are put on this earth to make a difference. He feels like I ha, but he’s not done yet. He wants to have on my tombstone that he made a difference.

Hyrum currently lives in Gunlock, Utah with his with his wife Gail Married 50 years in Dec 2016d, 6 children, 24 grandchildren (22 living)

Tweetable Quotes and Mentions

Listen to @hyrumwsmith to get over the hump on the @FastLeaderShow Click to Tweet

“How do I close my beliefs to be in line with reality?” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet

“Is there a gap between what matters most to me and what I’m doing?” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet 

“Pain is inevitable, misery is optional.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet 

“Being miserable is a choice; we don’t have to be miserable.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet  

“I’ll be able to deal with whatever the world throws at me.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet 

“Making a difference matters.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet  

“Happiness comes first and then productivity goes off the map.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet  

“Everybody already has a set of governing values.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet  

“If I identify my governing values I have to come face to face with my gaps.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet 

“Every human being shares three or four values.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet 

“I’ve got to bring my belief system in line with my values.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet 

“Think about others first and put yourself second.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet 

“There are three basic emotions that motivate us to do everything we do.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet  

“Fear, duty and love; we’re functioning under those emotions every day.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet 

“92% of executives do not take the time to plan their day.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet  

“I want to be proactive to do what matters most to me.” -Hyrum Smith Click to Tweet  

Hump to Get Over

Hyrum Smith was asked by Rudy Giuliani to come speak to the families of the victims of the World Trade Center attack. It became one of Hyrum’s toughest and most rewarding speaking experiences he has ever had. But before he could open his mouth a fireman jumped up to speak. Listen to what he said and how Hyrum got over the hump.

Advice for others

Identify what your governing values are.

Holding him back from being an even better leader

Keeping myself physically fit.

Best Leadership Advice Received

Think about others first and put yourself second.

Secret to Success

Understanding there are three basic emotions that motivate us to do everything we do – fear, duty and love.

Best tools that helps in business or Life

The commitment to spend 10-15 minutes every single day in the morning to plan my day.

Recommended Reading

Les Miserables (Word Cloud Classics)

Contacting Hyrum

Website: http://www.3gaps.com/

Website: http://www.hyrumwsmith.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hyrumwsmith

Twitter: https://twitter.com/hyrumwsmith

Resources

The 3 Gaps: Are You Making a Difference?

Creating an even better place to work

54 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) Competencies List: Emotional Intelligence has proven to be the right kind of intelligence to have if you want to move onward and upward faster. Get your free list today.


Subscribe to the Show on iTunes (Quick and simple!)

  1. Sign into iTunes using your ID and password
  2. Search the iTunes store for “Fast Leader Show”
  3. Click on the Subscribe button. It’s in the upper left corner of the screen.

Give Me a Rating or Review on iTunes (Also simple)

  1. Sign into iTunes using your ID and password
  2. Search the iTunes store for “Fast Leader Show”
  3. Click on “Ratings and Reviews”
  4. Give us a rating. Thank you for going ahead and leaving a “review” as well

 

Click to access edited transcript
Intro: Welcome to the Fast Leader Podcast, where we explore convenient yet effective shortcuts that will help you get ahead and move forward faster by becoming a better leader. And now here’s your host, customer and employee engagement expert and certified emotional intelligence practitioner, Jim Rembach.

And even better place to work is an easiest solution that gives you a continuous diagnostic on employee engagement along with integrated activities that will improve employee engagement unleash of skills in everyone. Using this award solutions guarantee to create motivated, productive and loyal employees who have great work relationships with their colleagues and your customers. To learn more about an even better place to work, visit beyondmorale.com/better.

Okay Fast Leader legion you’ll want to make sure that you go to iTunes and download and subscribe the Fast Leadership show if you haven’t already because this show is something you’re going to want to replay over and over because we have somebody today who’s made such a huge impact on what we do and what we’re all about here on the Fast Leadership show. Hyrum W. Smith was born in Centerville, Utah and raised in Hawaii where his father was a professor of speech. Hyrum grew up with a real need to be sensitive to other people’s feelings, it’s just how he was brought up. After graduating high school Hyrum spent two years in London, England. Upon his return he was drafted into the Army. After graduating honor graduate from Honors Canada School, he commandeered the Pershing missile unit in Germany. Hyrum graduated from Brigham Young University in 1971 in Business Management.

After spending several years in corporate America, Hyrum decided that he wanted to teach, so in 1981 Hyrum founded the Franklin Quest Company. Among the company’s other products Smith created the Franklin Planner and seminars on productivity development based on the belief window and other concepts. In 1997 Franklin Quest merge with Steven R. Covey’s Covey Leadership Center to form Franklin Covey. Hyrum is the author of several books including 10 Natural Laws of Successful Time and Life Management, What Matters Most, The Power of Perception and his more latest release being The 3 Gaps: Are you making a Difference.

Hyrum believes that you are put in this Earth to make a difference, he feels that he has but he’s not done yet. He wants on his tombstone that he did make a difference. Hyrum currently lives in Gunlock, Utah with his wife Gail, going to be celebrating their 50 year anniversary in December, and he also has six children and 24 grandchildren. Hyrum Smith, are you ready to help us get over the hump?

Hyrum Smith: Absolutely. Good morning. I’m excited to be here.

Jim Rembach: I’m so excited to have you.

Hyrum Smith: I’m going to give you my favorite quote when you mention my grandkids. “I’ve seen the light of Paris, I’ve seen the light of Rome my favorite lights are the taillights of my grandkid going home.”

Jim Rembach: I’m inspired to be able to say that one day, I’ll have to make sure I write that one. I’ve given our listeners a little bit about you can you tell us what your current passion is so that we can get to know you even better.

Hyrum Smith: My current passion is a passion that I’ve been curse with I think ever since I was 19. I was in London, England in 1963 I had the opportunity of sitting at the feet of Winston Churchill and hear him speak, it was just two years before he died. And he made a statement, he said almost wishfully he said, “You know I had this obsession on my life that I was supposed to make a difference. And then he said, “I hope I’d made a difference.” And I said that, “Are you kidding you just save the free world, we’re in the Second World War, I think you made a difference.” He cast up the time to—and I’ve had that passion ever since. We did the Franklin thing, we had over 6 million people using Franklin Planners, the concept that we thought—a value based goal setting is very compelling, powerful idea. The Franklin Planner was a tool to help people really manage what mattered most to them. And we went from my garage, three people on my garage one of them was my wife, to –we have 4 thousand people, over 600million in revenue, 6 million people using Franklin Planners. It was a fabulous opportunity experience. I sat down in 1999 as CEO at Franklin, I step up the board in all four and since them I haven’t been able to get rid of this thing in my gut that I’m supposed to be doing something more.

About a year and a half ago, a good friend of mine who closely worked with me at Franklin for 25 years named Richard (4:26 inaudible) he said, “You know, All that stuff you’ve been teaching for the last 40 years can be wrapped up into one simple idea. And I don’t know if I should be offended by that cause I’ve just captured 20 hours of stuff on the video of myself. And I said, “Really, what’s that?” He said, “It’s closing gap, it’s all you’ve ever taught about.” He said, “You taught about 3 gaps you need to write a book about it.” He said, “Let’s start a company.” So we did. I wrote the book, The 3 Gaps and it’s a capture of everything that I’ve been teaching in a very simple, powerful way. You want me to tell you what the 3 gaps are really fast?

Jim Rembach: Yeah. Please do.

Hyrum Smith: The first gap we call the belief gap. And the question is, I didn’t see my hands the question here is—is there gap between what I believe is true and what is actually true? Because if there’s a gap there I’m in trouble. For example, if I believe that gravity doesn’t work, I’m in trouble that could be painful. And so we create a simple blue print and it’s in the book, how do I close the belief gap to bring my beliefs in line with reality.

The second gap we call the time gap, and that’s what I taught about at Franklin for 40 years, and the question here is—is there a gap between what I did today and what I said I was going to do today, and if there’s a gap there I’m probably not aim some pain. And so how do I close the time gap. It is simple blueprint on how to do that we can dive as deep as you want into research.

Then the third one we call the value gap and this one is critical I think you to our happiness, we’ll talk about the relationship with happiness making a difference because I think that’s key and I’ll come back to that, but the third gap is the value gap. And the question here is—is there a gap between what matters most to me and what I’m doing? For example, if I value being physically fit and I weigh 300 lbs. I’m in pain. And if I want inner peace, happiness, if I want to make a difference I’ve got to close that gap. If I value being financially okay and I’m $500 thousand in debt, I’m in pain, so I’ve got to close the gap, there’s a simple blueprint to closing that gap, we can talk about those blueprint. It’s been fun to put that book together, got a call or publish the book and it’s available on Amazon and bookstores now. That’s what my passion is right now. Beside I still speak, I go out and do stuff because I love to do it and I’ll probably do that till I die.

Jim Rembach: Obviously when I had the opportunity to learn even more about you than what I had known initially. There’s several things that just kind of hit me and that first of all you yourself have been an inspiration to many and you seek inspiration from others. You just start talking about this whole three gaps piece and it’s working with others, working with the network to make things that more folks can use, it’s this whole collaboration. There’s just so many things that I hit from a leadership perspective that just know rolled right in my face. One of the things that we focus on looking at a lot of these different aspects is leadership quotes. And I know you talk about Churchill, you talk about even yourself and some of the things that you’ve been able to do. Just reading a little bit about the book you start out with some huge impact talking about right after the tragedy of 9/11 speaking to a lot of the survivor families and things like that, it’s just incredible. Is there a quote for you that kind of stands out as a guiding inspiration that you can share with us?

Hyrum Smith: Yes, in fact I don’t talk about this a lot but I think it’s okay here. I learn the statement, I actually wrote another book about it, and the quote let me give you the quote, and then I’ll tell you why it has so much meaning to me. And the quote is, “Pain is inevitable, misery is optional.” Let me just tell a story quick in New York, in about three weeks after 9/11 I got a call from Rudy Giuliani’s office and say, “Hey, we got a lot of people in pain here, would you and your partner Mr. Covey come and do a workshop for the families affected by 9/11? And I said, “Of course, when do you want us to come?” “Why don’t you come on October 19, which is five weeks after 9/11, and he said, “But, we can’t pay, got to get yourself here.” And I said, “Hey, we’ll do whatever you want.” So we came and they gave us a tour of ground zero that morning and it was a very surreal experience. Covey and I were standing with four policeman on 15 feet of compacted debris looking at an unbelievable hole, I’ve been in New York hundreds of times I’ve been in the World Trade a hundred times talk there met there, and this policeman told us the story and he said, “You know, I was here that morning, and he looks over and his eye was right there, I heard this big noise and I look up and all this stuff came flying out of the World Trade.” He said, “It look like paper at first and then started hitting the ground it was 50 foot I beams killing everybody it hit. I watched 34 people jumped from the tower, four of them were holding hands when they jumped. I watched eight fireman losing their life because people (10:07 inaudible) and then he said, “Mr. Smith how many computers you think there were in the World Trade sir? And I said, “Well, 50,000 people work there, probably a lot of computers.” He said, “We hadn’t found one computer. And I said, “How come?” He said, “Three thousand degrees fire and it’s still burning.” And while he was talking a crane pull an ibeam out of the rubble and it was dripping molten seal at the bottom, that’s how the morning starts.

We come back after the mid-time share and we walk into the ballroom designed for 1800 people but 23,000 crammed in this day. It starts off with two fireman, two policeman dressed loose walked in with the American flag, and I start to cry and then 60 young women from the Harlem’s girl choir march in they try to sound blew the roof off the play. I’m a mess, I was grateful Covey talked first he is just saying that’s my chair. I got to the front and before I could open my mouth a fireman about halfway back jumped up and said, “Mr. Smith you needed to tell us how get out of bed in the morning when we just don’t give a crap anymore? That’s how it started, just turned out it’s one of the toughest and maybe most rewarding speaking experiences I’ve ever had.

And I look at that fireman and I said, “Listen, you remember the thing I said today you remember these words, Pain is inevitable misery is optional.” And then I said to know what point am I trying to make? The fact is bad things happen to good people. And I said, “You know people lose a furrow and case, and accidents happen where kids were killed and I learned this when I lost a daughter, a granddaughter in a car accident 1995, and you expect to outlive your kids. A very close friend of mine shared that with me just before the funeral and it kind of kept me going after I have that experience. And said to that crowd in New York, “You know, we’re not going to get through this mortal experience without some pain, we’re people we’re going to have pain. The issue is how do we deal with the pain? Being miserable is a choice we don’t have to be miserable.” And the great thing about America that is we’ve always chosen not to be miserable. And then I give a couple of examples, I said, “You know, I’ll never demean, or put down what happen to you on 9/11 isn’t bad,” but I said, “go back in history 150 years on this planet and compare 9/11 to what’s happen on this planet in the last 150 years. And you know what? What happen here on 9/11 doesn’t even come up on the scope of ugliness in comparison.

And I just gave a couple of example, my wife and I were guest at the Marine Corps on Iwo Jima 2010 for the 65th anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima, eight thousand dead marines in 34 days, 20thousand dead Japanese at the same battle, 20 thousand wounded marines, how often do we reference that? The killing fields of Cambodia and stuff going on today, and I said, “So the fact is as we experience pain, and that’s why this gaps are important, if I’ve got this gaps coming to a close I’ll be able to deal with whatever the world’s draws up and then I find in making a difference and I said, one interesting thing, the most productive period of time in our history was the Second World War, and why? People felt like they were making a difference and they were. Women were building B25, men were out at the war, and people were saving scrap metal from their yards everybody was making a difference. We build destroyers in 8 days during the Second World War and productivity went up met. So making a difference matters. How do I make a difference? Well I’ve got to have—I like the inner peace which brings these happiness stature. All my life I was taught put your nose to the grind stone work hard and someday you have the right to be happy. And it’s just backwards and I think we’ve know that happiness comes first and then productivity goes up the met. How do I become happy? Close those three gaps and I’ll tell you what? Happiness is there, suddenly I’m making a difference and nobody has to tell me to get up of bed in the morning. Nobody else has to motivate me externally, I’m motivating myself, just get out of my way.

Jim Rembach: You’re right and one of the things that we talk a lot on the Fast Leader show is getting over a humps. You’re talking about gaps, so we talk about humps and we usually ask if somebody has a story that they can share about humps. Well you just hit on too talking about getting up there and speaking to those folks and those families of the deceased for the World Trade Center and then also losing your daughter and a granddaughter. Gosh, those are huge and when I start thinking about the gap as you refer to them is that you talk about beliefs, values and time. In the book and this is pretty easy read, we’ll make to it on the show notes page, for me I want to resonate and connect with in order being that the values are first. What would you say in response to that?

Hyrum Smith: Okay, I think the values do come first. I think that’s a very important key that you’ve identify because everybody already has, was I like to call a set of governing values, we all have them. And the issue is, am I doing anything about them? And so let me just gave you the quick blueprints, only three steps thing a blueprint of how to close that gap. Number one, identify what the values are, make a list of them. Number two, write a clarifying statement for each value. And then number three, prioritize the values. Now why would I prioritize values? If one of my values is integrity and one is and my company ask me to do something that isn’t quite right, if integrity is above loyalty, I won’t do it. If loyalty is above integrity, I will, are you with me? And we create that process Jim, to writing your own personal constitution. What you do in that three step process is write your own personal constitution. Let me just run you through the I-beam. Have you ever heard the I-beam experience?

Jim Rembach: Not the experience. Please go.

Hyrum Smith: Let me just tell it really quick. I was at the Command General staff called for Eleven Worth six weeks ago and I have 1500 new majors in the role, that very cool experience. I said I’m going to help you identify your governing values I need one of you to help me that has a child under the age of two. Major jumps up, I have a son too, and I said, “Okay”. Just answer some questionthank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom, the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump.

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster. we’re going to find out one of your governing values. And I said, “I have and I-beam in the parking lot 300 feet long, you’re’ at one end I’m at the other end. I hold up a $100 bill and say, if you come across that I-beam without stepping off either side get here in three minutes, I’ll give you a $100, would you come? Oh, yeah, I’ll come. I said, Okay we’re going to take that I-beam to the Grand Canyon, there’s a place there 300hundred feet across, 1100 feet straight down bolt it in both walls, you’re in one side I’m on the other side. It’s raining and the winds is about 40 miles an hour, and I said, I hold out my $100 bucks will you come across that I-beam get here in two minutes without stepping out either side, would you come now? No way. I now have $10,000 unmarked bills would you come now? No way? I have $50,000 would you come now? No way. I have $1 million, would you risk the I-beam for a million dollars? No way. I said okay Major, I now have your child over the air an edge by the hair, if you don’t get across that I-beam right now, and I’m going to drop your child, would you come now? Am I (18:29 inaudible) you and I got there. And I said we just found one of your governing values and that governing values is, I love my child. Safety has value, money has value or a greater value is the love of a child. He would probably risk the I-beam for the child. That’s what governing values are all about. I did this one to the women that had a teenager, they will not come across for a teenager. The question they got to ask now is, as I sit down to do step one, identify my values ask the question, what would I cross the I-beam for?

Jim Rembach: You bring up a good point. I just conducted workshop a couple of weeks ago and we went over the helping a group of individuals in a collective to be able to identify their values and we went through some activities and about midway through I ask, who’s ever gone through this? A type of exercise before to identify your values? And just a few hands went up and the only reason their hands went up is because they did it in a corporate environment they were trying to identify corporate values but people just don’t go through that activity.

Hyrum Smith: And you know what, some interesting reason to what, if I identify my governing values the highest priorities in my life. I also have to come face to face with the gaps what I’m not doing about them and that is painful. Life is the best disinfection and when we cast light on the gaps all of the sudden we intuitively start doing something about it. I would never tell anybody what their gap and what their values are but I think every human being shares three of four values, family, education, physical wellness, integrity, financial okay-ness, people start there. And then once I start identifying my values now my beliefs is ** I’m going to bring my beliefs system in line with my values, are you with me? And all of the sudden there’s a reason to close the time gap. Why? Because I know what matters most to me now.

Jim Rembach: That’s a good point.

Hyrum Smith: You got a nerve there.

Jim Rembach: Oh, yes. And even my seven year old son, Tuesday evening is our Cub Scout night and he was not wanting to go. “Dad why do we have to go to Cub Scout?” I said, “Well, because of God, family and country. Those are the three most important things in your life. Now get in the truck.”

Hyrum Smith: And I said, you’re going.

Jim Rembach: That’s right. I’ve even told my older one who’s kind of going to the same issues every once in a while. He’s like, “Why do I need to go? I was like, “What’s your last name?” Do you want to keep it? This is what we do.

Hyrum Smith: I use to say to my kids, “Do you like **?

Jim Rembach: I know you got a lot of things going on, you talk about—it’s been several years since you stepped down the CEO, with ** Covey you’ve been doing a lot of different things, and you have the new book released. But when you start thinking about what’s next? What are some of your goals?

Hyrum Smith: Right now we started another company and we’re calling it The three gaps, that’s the name of the company. We’ve created a half day seminar and we’re working with Sanyo, (21:50 inaudible) Corporations. At Lory’s I’m excited about the age in which we live is it we can now drop this information this concept from the sky. I don’t have to get on an airplane, I’ve got six million miles of commercial aircraft, I’m not excited getting on airplanes anymore but this kind of thing where I can talk to the world about this three gaps and the difference that makes in your life when you close those gap, that’s very exciting to me. And I’m sitting here in my office on a ranch in Southwestern Utah I’m only a 100 miles from Las Vegas. I have a real passion about that, the whole need to get this message out. It’s simple, it’s short but it’s not easy, it’s tough it’s hard to beat.

Jim Rembach: And the Fast Leader Legion wishes you the very best. Now before we move on let’s get a quick work from our sponsor.

Need a powerful and entertaining way to ignite your next conference, retreat or team-building session? My keynote don’t include magic but they do have the power to help your tennis take a leap forward by putting emotional intelligence into their employee engagement, customer engagement and customer centric leadership practices. So bring the infotainment creativity the Fast Leader show to your next event. Go to beyondmorale.com/speaking to learn more.

Here we go Fast Leader listeners, it’s time for the Hump Day Hoedown. Okay Hyrum, the Hump Day Hoedown is the part of our show where you give us good insights fast. So, I’m going to ask you several questions and your job is to give us robust yet rapid responses that are going to help us move onward and upward faster. Hyrum Smith, are you ready to hoedown?

Hyrum Smith: Absolutely.

Jim Rembach: Alright. So, what do you think is holding you back from being a better leader today?

Hyrum Smith: I think the only thing holding me back right now is keeping my self physically fit, in good shape. I know what to say, I know how I want to reach people I’m 72 years old, I’m in pretty good share and so I say, “You know, I’m going to keep myself in good physical shape so that doesn’t get in my way of getting out and sharing a message that I think matters to the human race.

Jim Rembach: What is the best leadership advice you have received?

Hyrum Smith: I think the best leadership advice I have received is think about others first, put yourself second, listen and people will follow.

Jim Rembach: What is one of your secrets that you believe contributes to you success?

Hyrum Smith: I think understanding that there’s three basic emotions that motivates us to do everything we do, fear, duty and love. At fear, the feelings are I have to do it, duty the feelings are I ought to do and then at love I want to do it. We’re functioning Jim under one of those emotions every day the issue is can I manage myself from fear to love. If I show off the work cause I have to be there, no energy. If I’m there because I ought to be there, more energy, if I’m there cause I want to be there, get out of my way. And so my job is to manage myself into the love want to area that’s where miracles at.

Jim Rembach: What is one of your best tools that helps you lead in business or life?

Hyrum Smith: The commitment to spend 10 to 15 minutes every single day for me in the morning, planning my day. And that’s not all planning, it’s a 15 minutes of solitude and planning getting away from the world. I’m really in the scriptures, I study scriptures every day, I’m in prayer for me it may not be just meditation for some people but centering yourself every single day before you start, late at night if you want. But I will tell you 92% of the executives in America men and women do not take time to plan their day. And if they would do that the impact that it will have on their personal and professional productivity will blow them away.

Jim Rembach: What would be one book that you’d recommend to our listeners, it could be from any genre?

Hyrum Smith: This will surprise you, this book had the most impact on me other than the scriptures it’s Les Miserable, the unabridged version of the Les Miserable. It’s all about a guy who discovered the abundance mentality. There’s a scarcity mentality that says it’s not enough for everybody so I better grab what I can and hold down to it. The abundance mentality says there’s plenty so I can share what I have. And that story—this book is written in 1815 by Victor Hugo. It’s a marvelous book that had a real impact, that just cost me a lot of money cause I’ve given away books and my money goes to that book.

Jim Rembach: Okay Fast Leader listeners, you can find links to that and other bonus information from today show by going to fastleader.net/Hyrum Smith. Okay Hyrum, this is my last Hump Day Hoedown question. Imagine you were given the opportunity to go back to the age of 25 and you’ve been given the opportunity to take the knowledge and skills that you have now back with you but you can’t take everything back you can only choose one, so what skills or piece of knowledge would you take back with you and why?

Hyrum Smith: I would the idea and concept of deciding every single day that I’m going to do something about what matters most to me. I don’t want to react what the world is telling me I ought to do, I want to be proactive and decide, this is what Hyrum Smith wants to do. Because I found at age 25, quite frankly, I was doing what everybody else what me to do. When they want me to do is reacted and it wasn’t a lot of fun. And the minute that I discover power of doing what mattered most to me and that’s closing this gaps, quite frankly, all of the sudden my life turn around and I had a remarkable experience.

Jim Rembach: Hyrum it was an honor to spend time with you today. Can you please share with Fast Leader listeners how they can connect with you?

Hyrum Smith: Absolutely. We have a website, 3gaps.com, the 3 gaps book is available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble bookstores. But go to our website—and I should mention that we have created a digital learning module that helps people write their own personal constitution play the game at the end you push the button and your constitution appears. It’s a powerful tools, they can get that on our website just go to 3gaps.com.

Jim Rembach: Hyrum Smith thank you for sharing your knowledge and wisdom, the Fast Leader legion honors you and thanks you for helping us get over the hump.

Thank you for joining me on the Fast Leader show today. For recaps, links from every show, special offers and access to download and subscribe, if you haven’t already, head on over the fastleader.net so we can help you move onward and upward faster.

END OF AUDIO

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More